Facebook wants your nudes to fight revenge porn

Steve Phelps
November 9, 2017

As Facebook tests the new strategy out in various countries, some state laws in the United States are making sharing non-consensual explicit images a federal crime, like child porn. Then the social networking firm, in collaboration with e-Safety, wants the users to upload their intimate photos directly to their messenger.

This is not the first attempt by the social media giant to combat the increasing menace of revenge porn.

But can you trust Facebook?

When your private image is sent to yourself, Facebook's technology will "hash" it, which is a high-tech way of saying it will create a digital footprint or ink for the image. Four percent of internet users have fallen victim to it, and 10 percent of women under 30 have had someone threaten to post explicit photos of them online against their will, according to a 2016 study by Data & Society.

My hope and expectation is that Facebook will automate the process as much as possible, but that there may need to be some human involvement to review submitted images.

The social network then apparently applies hashing technology to create a unique digital fingerprint of the image, so that if another user tries to upload it the image will be blocked.

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She then sat on the stairs of the section and refused to move, leading to the officers having to forcibly take her out. She was subsequently arrested for Battery on a Law Enforcement Officer and Disorderly Conduct/Breach of the peace.

The system has been launched in partnership with an Australian government agency headed up by the e-safety commissioner, Julia Inman Grant. Here's the catch: Facebook needs to have a nude photo to recognize and delete a nude photo.

"They're not storing the image, they're storing the link and using artificial intelligence and other photo-matching technologies", e-Safety Commissioner Julie Inman Grant told ABC.

It is important to note that 4% of US internet users have become victims of revenge porn, according to a 2016 study.

As a platform (in) directly responsible for the proliferation of revenge porn, Facebook is now trying to help put a stop to it. If you're fortunate enough to not know, revenge porn involves spreading someone's embarrassing nude photos without their consent, whether it's an ex-lover or a celebrity with poor iCloud security.

Facebook will store these images for a short period of time before deleting them to ensure it is enforcing the policy correctly, the company said.

Facebook said it looked forward "to getting feedback and learning" from the trial.

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